"Stories of imagination tend to upset those without one."
~ Terry Pratchett

MLS graduate with an interest in stories: stories in books, stories in movies, stories in comics, stories on stage, stories on the internet, happy stories, sad stories, funny stories, fantasy stories, post-apocalyptic stories, mythological stories, my stories, your stories, histories, Terry Pratchett's stories, Hiromu Arakawa's stories, Young Adult stories, animated stories, live action stories, based-on-a-true-story stories, completely made up stories, STORIES.

writerhelp:

You often hear about how mental illness is being overused or somehow romanticized in literature these days, and even though I can’t actually disagree with that, I don’t think it’s something wrong to write about. 
But I’ve seen many writers go through an amazing plot with well developed characters just to fall into the trap of the consequences of those conflicts and whatever happened in them, especially in a series of books. Characters suffer just as much as real people, and they are going to suffer from everything that you put into their lives. Sometimes they change for good, sometimes they change for bad.
And as a disclaimer, let me just add that I do not support any kind of good word about mental illness because if you suffer from it you should get help and it should not become something people seek just because they think it’s cool. Romanticizing mental illness is something I dislike and it’s very offensive to a lot of people, and you shouldn’t do it. It’s not something pretty or trendy. This stuff is serious.
Dealing with tragic events isn’t something easy, simple or fast. Remember to give it some thought, because it will define what type of character you’re writing and how the reader sees him/her. How will a funeral, for example, affect your MC? Will she/he even attend it and if not, what does this say about him/her?

Dealing with Trauma

Professional Help

Illness

Others

(via mooseings)

writingandresources:

A helpful list of resources for all your fictional victorian piracy needs, brought to you by writingandresources! 

(The sources on this particular list is mostly relevant to European pirates of the 16th and 17th centuries only, not modern or Asian pirates. Some sources are from the Victorian era (1800’s) but should help put things in perspective. Take with a grain of salt, and keep this in mind even when writing fantasy stories!)

SHIPS & SAILING

PIRATES

CRIME, PUNISHMENT, AND CONDUCT

CURRENCY

AVOIDING INCORRECT STEREOTYPES

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

drinkmasturbatecry:

nudityandnerdery:

the-fandoms-are-valentines:

grandtheftautosanandreas:

Douglas Adams is the best when it comes to describe characters

they need to teach classes on Douglas Adams analogies okay
“He leant tensely against the corridor wall and frowned like a man trying to unbend a corkscrew by telekinesis.”
"Stones, then rocks, then boulders which pranced past him like clumsy puppies, only much, much bigger, much, much harder and heavier, and almost infinitely more likely to kill you if they fell on you.”
"He gazed keenly into the distance and looked as if he would quite like the wind to blow his hair back dramatically at that point, but the wind was busy fooling around with some leaves a little way off.”
"It looked only partly like a spaceship with guidance fins, rocket engines and escape hatches and so on, and a great deal like a small upended Italian bistro.”
"If it was an emotion, it was a totally emotionless one. It was hatred, implacable hatred. It was cold, not like ice is cold, but like a wall is cold. It was impersonal, not as a randomly flung fist in a crowd is impersonal, but like a computer-issued parking summons is impersonal. And it was deadly - again, not like a bullet or a knife is deadly, but like a brick wall across a motorway is deadly.”

And, of course: "The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don’t."

the one that will always stay with me is “Arthur Dent was grappling with his consciousness the way one grapples with a lost bar of soap in the bath,” i feel like that was the first time i really understood what you could do with words.

drinkmasturbatecry:

nudityandnerdery:

the-fandoms-are-valentines:

grandtheftautosanandreas:

Douglas Adams is the best when it comes to describe characters

they need to teach classes on Douglas Adams analogies okay

He leant tensely against the corridor wall and frowned like a man trying to unbend a corkscrew by telekinesis.”

"Stones, then rocks, then boulders which pranced past him like clumsy puppies, only much, much bigger, much, much harder and heavier, and almost infinitely more likely to kill you if they fell on you.”

"He gazed keenly into the distance and looked as if he would quite like the wind to blow his hair back dramatically at that point, but the wind was busy fooling around with some leaves a little way off.”

"It looked only partly like a spaceship with guidance fins, rocket engines and escape hatches and so on, and a great deal like a small upended Italian bistro.”

"If it was an emotion, it was a totally emotionless one. It was hatred, implacable hatred. It was cold, not like ice is cold, but like a wall is cold. It was impersonal, not as a randomly flung fist in a crowd is impersonal, but like a computer-issued parking summons is impersonal. And it was deadly - again, not like a bullet or a knife is deadly, but like a brick wall across a motorway is deadly.”

And, of course:

"The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don’t."

the one that will always stay with me is “Arthur Dent was grappling with his consciousness the way one grapples with a lost bar of soap in the bath,” i feel like that was the first time i really understood what you could do with words.

(via modmad)

adventuresofcesium:

adventuresofcesium:

i can’t stop thinking about how the only reason that the fire nation didn’t manage to conquer and destroy the world is because katara flipped a shit on her brother for making a sexist comment and stumbled upon aang in the iceberg

this post is getting notes and now i can’t stop thinking about how much of the plot is driven by katara’s idealism. there’s a reason she’s the one who speaks during the opening credits, reiterating with every episode that she believes Aang can save the world. she gets the story moving through her refusal to put up with bullshit and she takes the gaang on so many of their most meaningful journeys because she never gives up on people and on the possibility of a better future. even when it’s naive and it seems futile, like her speech to the earthbending prisoners or her fight against a sexist waterbending master who would have kicked her ass and thought nothing of it if he hadn’t been in love with her grandmother, she aggressively tries to right every wrong she sees.

i also love the way that she’s both a healer and a warrior. water is seen as a healing and cleansing element, but it can also be fierce and influential. Katara shows that those things aren’t mutually exclusive. her fundamental instinct is to nurture and to protect, and yes, to heal, but she rejects the northern water tribe’s attempts to make her passive and nonviolent. she wants to be a warrior because she recognizes that the only way to heal the world now is to fight for it, and to fight for people even when they don’t think they’re worth fighting for anymore. 

i just fucking love katara.

(via chongthenomad)